Wednesday, 17 January 2018

Alarming Things That Causes Of Sarcoidosis, Note This!

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Sarcoidosis is a disease that results from a specific type of inflammation of tissues of the body. It can appear in almost any body organ, but it starts most often in the lungs or lymph nodes. Lofgren's syndrome, a type of sarcoidosis, is more common in people of European descent. Lofgren's syndrome may involve fever, enlarged lymph nodes, arthritis (usually in the ankles), and/or erythema nodosum. Erythema nodosum is a rash of red or reddish-purple bumps on your ankles and shins. The rash may be warm and tender to the touch.


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Sarcoidosis is somewhat more common in women than in men. The disease usually develops between the ages of 20 and 50. People who have a family history of sarcoidosis also are at higher risk for the disease. Researchers have looked for a link between sarcoidosis and exposure to workplace and environmental factors. However, no clear link has been found. Sarcoidosis can affect any organ in your body. However, it's more likely to affect some organs than others. The disease usually starts in the lungs, skin, and/or lymph nodes (especially the lymph nodes in your chest). Also, the disease often affects the eyes and liver. Although less common, sarcoidosis can affect the heart and brain, leading to serious complications.
If many granulomas form in an organ, they can affect how the organ works. This can cause signs and symptoms. Signs and symptoms vary depending on which organs are affected. Many people who have sarcoidosis have no signs or symptoms or mild ones.

Risk factors
While anyone can develop sarcoidosis, factors that may increase your risk include:

  • Age and sex : Sarcoidosis often occurs between the ages of 20 and 40. Women are slightly more likely to develop the disease. 
  • Race : African-Americans have a higher incidence of sarcoidosis than do white . 
  • Americans : Also, sarcoidosis may be more severe and may be more likely to recur and cause lung problems in African-Americans. 
  • Family history : If someone in your family has had sarcoidosis, you're more likely to develop the disease.


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Complications  
For most people, sarcoidosis resolves on its own with no lasting consequences. But sometimes it causes long-term problems.
  • Lungs : Untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis can lead to permanent scarring in your lungs, making it difficult to breathe.
  • Eyes : Inflammation can affect almost any part of your eye and can eventually cause blindness. Rarely, sarcoidosis also can cause cataracts and glaucoma.
  • Kidneys : Sarcoidosis can affect how your body handles calcium, which can lead to kidney failure. 
  • Heart : Granulomas in your heart can cause abnormal heart rhythms and other heart problems. In rare instances, this may lead to death. 
  • Nervous system : A small number of people with sarcoidosis develop problems related to the central nervous system when granulomas form in the brain and spinal cord. Inflammation in the facial nerves, for example, can cause facial paralysis.

Causes Of Sarcoidosis
The cause of sarcoidosis isn't known. More than one factor may play a role in causing the disease. Some researchers think that sarcoidosis develops if your immune system responds to a trigger, such as bacteria, viruses, dust, or chemicals. Normally, your immune system defends your body against foreign or harmful substances. For example, it sends special cells to protect organs that are in danger.
These cells release chemicals that recruit other cells to isolate and destroy the harmful substance. Inflammation occurs during this process. Once the harmful substance is gone, the cells and the inflammation go away.
In people who have sarcoidosis, the inflammation doesn't go away. Instead, some of the immune system cells cluster to form lumps called granulomas in various organs in your body.






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Author: Richard Smith